LwL Podcast Episode 50 – #LwL50 AMA

50 episodes! To celebrate this epic milestone Mike Jones hosts an Ask Me Anything (AMA), turning the tables on me by asking listeners and previous participants to submit questions on a variety of topics. This episode also features a surprise (to me) quiz, where I unleashed my poorly-concealed Monica from Friends competitive side…

I deliberately chose not to have sight of the questions beforehand, so the answers you hear are spontaneous. I have included every question I was asked, although I have made small edits for clarity and where I was rambling with no purpose trying to come up with an answer. I have left the pauses in during the quiz section for tension-creation purposes.

Huge thanks to Mike for putting a phenomenal amount of work into putting this episode together and for being an ace Quizmeister General.

Many thanks to the following people for submitting questions: Ian Anstice, Holger Aman, Sam Burgess, Mike Ewen, Paul Jeorrett, Sally Walker, Jen Bayjoo, Jo Cornish, Clare McCluskey Dean, Heather Marshall, Ellie Downes, David Clover and Helen Monagle.

Normal service will be resumed on 26th March with the wonderful Phil Bradley.

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LwL Podcast Episode 49: Rebecca Hill

In Episode 49 of the Librarians with Lives podcast I chat to Rebecca Hill, Senior Library Assistant at the University of Huddersfield. She previously worked in FE at Huddersfield New College library. We chat about making the leap from FE to HE [spoiler – it’s not easy], library qualifications, Vikings, the usual….

Becky very kindly gave me some links to share with you:

  1. World Book Day fundraising for Book Aid International: 2013

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2013-03-11-library-makes-a-difference-around-the-world

  1. First Student Library Volunteer team recognised during National Volunteers Week: 2013

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2013-06-07-library-volunteers-rewarded-as-part-of-volunteers-week

  1. College Students & Staff read Alice in Wonderland for Read for RNIB Day: 2013

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2013-10-11-college-reads-for-rnib

  1. Poetry by Heart 2013/14 – national poetry recitation competition success: 2014

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2013-12-20-students-put-the-heart-and-soul-into-poetry-recital – College Heat & Championship

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2014-02-17-jenny-proves-she-s-got-heart – Jennifer O’Sullivan wins County Finals

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2014-03-24-pride-and-poetry-in-poetry-by-heart-finals – Jennifer O’Sullivan at the National Semi-finals in London

  1. Student Volunteer Team 2013/14 recognised & 2 V50 Awards: 2014

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2014-05-09-library-volunteer-reward-celebration

  1. Six Book Challenge Success for Students: 2014

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2014-07-03-reading-to-success

  1. Poetry by Heart 2014/15 – national poetry recitation competition success: 2015

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2014-11-18-poetry-in-motion  – Saliha Khadim win’s College Heat & Championship

https://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-02-02-saliha-khadim-to-represent-west-yorkshire-in-the-poetry-by-heart-semi-finals – Saliha Khadim wins County Finals

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-03-27-2nd-year-at-poetry-by-heart-national-semi-finals-for-hnc – Saliha Khadim competing at the National Semi-Finals in Cambridge

  1. World Book Day 2015 – Author James Aitcheson visit:

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-03-06-world-book-day-2015-1

  1. World Book Night Book Giveaway 2015:

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-04-24-world-book-night

  1. Six Book Challenge Success for Students: 2015

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-05-13-another-successful-six-book-challenge

  1. Student Volunteer Success 2014/15:

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-06-18-college-students-are-vinspired

  1. Celebrating National Poetry Day & launching Poetry by Heart: 2015

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-10-09-national-poetry-day-at-hnc

  1. Students Alicia & Praveen achieve V50 VInspired Awards: 2015

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-11-23-v50-success-for-hnc-students

  1. Poetry by Heart College Heats & Championship: 2015

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-12-02-third-time-lucky-for-poetry-by-heart

  1. National Literacy Trust Big Book Sale: 2015

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2015-12-07-big-book-raises-62-for-charity

  1. Reading Ahead student shares reviews on Reading Agency blog: 2016

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-03-16-another-successful-year-for-the-reading-ahead-challenge

  1. 30th V10 VInspired award to Student Volunteer: 2016

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-03-23-further-success-for-vinspired-library-volunteers

  1. Reading Ahead Success for Students: 2016

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-04-18-reading-ahead-at-hnc 

  1. World Book Night Book Give Away – Record breaking success! : 2016

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-04-19-sharing-the-gift-of-reading-for-world-book-night

  1. Readathon sponsored read fundraising success: 2016

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-04-29-students-raise-impressive-sum-for-charity-in-sponsored-read

  1. Double V100 VInspired Awards for Student Volunteers: 2016

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-05-06-alicia-and-praveen-make-hnc-history-with-v100-awards

  1. Reading Ahead student starts book blog from challenge: 2016

http://www.huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-05-13-reading-ahead-inspires-student-to-start-book-blog-more

  1. VInspired Scheme set to have another bumper year at HNC Library 2016

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-10-07-vinspired-scheme-set-to-have-another-bumper-year-at-hnc-library

  1. Festive Tales and Teapots party fundraise for National Literacy Trust 2016

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2016-12-13-festive-tales-teapots-party-for-national-literacy-trust

  1. World Book Day 2017 Celebrations:

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2017-03-06-hnc-celebrates-world-book-day

  1. Star Wars Day Celebrations 2017

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2017-05-09-may-the-force-be-with-you

  1. Summer Tales and Teapots Party for National Literacy Trust 2017

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2017-05-12-sequel-success-for-tales-and-teapots-party-fundraiser

  1. Young Writers Success 2017

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2017-05-16-young-writers-success

  1. Reading Ahead Record Breaking Success 2017

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/latest/2017-05-19-reading-ahead-2017-a-new-success-record

  1. Reading Matters/Beanstalk training for H&SC + Early Years Students 2018

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2018-03-14-hnc-students-train-to-help-change-children-s-lives

  1. HNC College Short Story Competition 2018

https://huddnewcoll.ac.uk/news/2018-05-22-a-way-with-words

The next episode will be released on Tuesday 12th March and is a special 50th episode edition – LwL50.

Happy listening!

FCLIP – it’s all about the process, not the outcome

I have – finally – submitted my CILIP Fellowship portfolio. I want to celebrate the effort I have put in to writing, pulling together and submitting the portfolio, rather than the achievement itself (if/when it comes.)

I did Chartership in 2007 when you had to submit three printed folders. Guided by my wonderful mentor Allison I wrote the portfolio when I was seven months pregnant with my twin girls. I don’t remember it being an onerous process: I gathered evidence, put together a statement, pulled the portfolios together and posted the cumbersome package off to CILIP. I found out I’d achieved Chartership when my twins were a month old.

As revalidation is optional I didn’t bother doing it until 2016. I *meant* to do it every year but I was distracted by, variously: parenting small twins, building and running a library, having an early mid-life crisis and re-training to be a sport psychologist, dealing with health issues, wider family crises, bereavements and, finally, being ill.

By the time I got around to revalidating everything was done on the VLE and felt like a bit of a dark art. Part of the process seemed to be figuring out how to use the system, but revalidation itself was straightforward. I updated the CPD log, put together my statement, and submitted. I revalidated on three successive occasions. The easiest Revalidation I did was the year I was off work for a significant period.

I registered for Fellowship in February 2017. I’d let go of my professional networks when I was unwell and felt disconnected. I won a bursary to attend the CILIP Conference in Manchester. During the drinks reception I got chatting to Juanita and Jo from CILIP. They were both really encouraging and as she had successfully navigated the process recently, Juanita was able to offer lots of advice. She gave me a list of things that I could do, including completing the initial PKSB which I duly did.

I decided to record some interviews with library workers from other sectors to include in my – at this stage mythical – FCLIP portfolio as evidence of wider professional involvement, which became the Librarians with Lives podcast. I whinged about FCLIP. Barbara Band contacted me on Twitter and offered to be my mentor. Using the PKSB I created an incredibly detailed and highly pointless spreadsheet matching the areas for development with things I was doing/had done. Barbara came to meet me in April 2018, gave me a load of useful advice and I vowed to crack on.

I tried to write the evaluative statement on several occasions but had to deal with the tyranny of the blank page. My friend George offered her assistance. In September 2018 we sat in a café and she typed while I told her stuff. It was mostly her saying ‘You did X. How did you do that?’ and me replying ‘I don’t know. I just did it’ and her sighing and writing something coherent. Several hours later we’d put together version 1 of my evaluative statement. I pulled my portfolio together on the VLE. Barbara came back with a comprehensive list of questions, changes, corrections and suggested amendments.

After that I couldn’t face looking at the portfolio for another two months. In the interim I spoke at seven professional events in six weeks where I riffed on my lack of Fellowship progress. It became a sad joke that my speaker bio always said: ‘Jo is currently working towards CILIP Fellowship’. At CILIPS Autumn Gathering two people – separately – came up to me after my talk, gently asked if I was ok and told me that I didn’t *have* do FCLIP now if I wasn’t feeling well enough. At the HMC Librarians Conference one of the attendees, the wonderful Kate, came up to me after my workshop and asked ‘What’s stopping you pressing the submit button?’ I explained that my portfolio was awful. She kindly said that I could send her the draft evaluative statement and she would offer some advice.

In November 2018 I met with my line manager and asked him to write FCLIP into my workplan. I booked a meeting room, removed all distractions and set to work on version 2 of the portfolio. Kate gave me loads of useful advice: ‘This is too descriptive’ ‘Stop telling the story’ ‘What was the result of this?’ ‘Stop wasting words’. The statement went backwards and forward between us several times. I had a complete break over the Christmas period and decided to tackle it again in January. I went through the changes that Kate had suggested to versions 3 and 4 of the statement and once I was happy I updated the portfolio. Barbara came back with some more suggestions and now my portfolio is worthy of submission.

The evaluative statement is unrecognisable from the version that George and I put together in September. I think two partial sentences have made it all the way from versions 1 to 5. The process of writing the evaluative statement has been complicated by the fact that I tend towards the negative and am harder on myself than anyone else could ever be. I’m also bad at owning work-based achievements so my inclination is to say ‘we’ or depersonalise. Apparently, I’m unusual because I found writing the wider professional context and organisational context sections easier than the personal section. The latter has been subject to the most changes during the five versions of the statement. I’m now ready to let the assessors pull the portfolio apart and give their verdict.

Achieving FCLIP won’t give me anything particularly tangible. I’ll get some extra letters after my name and a nice certificate. My colleagues will get cake. I won’t earn any more money for having it. However, it’s likely to be the last academic endeavour I’ll ever complete. For years I kept going back to academia in a fruitless effort to become the cleverest person in the room. I know now that I don’t need to chase qualifications to prove my worth (to myself) as a person.

Submitting FCLIP also marks the culmination of my ‘comeback’, as it were. In 2016 I was convinced that I was done with librarianship. I couldn’t see how I could ever return to work and be the same as I was before I was ill. I can’t begin to describe how frightening it is to go from being able to write library strategy papers and academic essays to becoming incapable of writing a simple email and then to slowly, slowly recover enough to get myself to a point where I could even contemplate doing Fellowship.

Nothing I do is achieved in isolation. I’m incredibly lucky to be surrounded by amazing people. Glenn and our girls at home for giving me the rounded life I badly need. Matt for being my second brain and the other half of TGLTTWHES. Richard for being the line manager I need (and writing one of the supporting statements for my portfolio), and many other brilliant colleagues at work. Helen, Jo and Juanita at CILIP for kicking it all off. George for helping me write version 1 of the evaluative statement and for tolerating me sending her #FCKFCLIP when she asked me how it was going on Whatsapp. Barbara for taking me on as a mentee and guiding me through the process. Kate for the advice and support. Anyone that’s ever had anything to do with Librarians with Lives. My Library Twitter crowd.

I’m not saying that the outcome is completely irrelevant – I’ll definitely feel down if I fail or if I am asked to make significant changes to the portfolio. However, I think we’re too quick to dismiss the process and focus on the end product. FCLIP has been significantly harder than I ever imagined it would be when I enrolled. At some stage I’ll write something about my opinions on FCLIP itself and I’ll attempt to offer some advice to those thinking of doing, or embarking on the Fellowship journey. For now I’ll just bask in the fact that I have Finally Submitted The Damn Thing.

 

LwL Podcast Episode 48 – Holger Aman

In Episode 48 of the Librarians with Lives podcast I chat to Holger Aman, now working at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia as the Coordinator, Learning and Teaching Services. When I interviewed him for the podcast back in October 2018 he was working at BPP Holborn (UK) as the Library Manager.

We recorded the interview in person at BPP. Get comfy because there’s a backstory involved. When I did a call-out for people to get involved in Librarians with Lives…LIVE! at the CILIP Conference last year, Holger answered. However, we couldn’t make the timings work because break-out sessions, roving interviews, travel chaos, etc. When I podcasted at ILI, he answered my shout-out again and this time, because I had a stand, he knew where to find me. At the exact moment Holger came over to podcast I had a queue of people. When I spotted Holger in the queue I pointed at him and said STAND THERE! I may even have said STAY! What can I say? I get bossy when I’m podcasting at conferences.

Holger recorded his bit for the live(ish) episode and I did my classic ‘You should be a proper guest on the podcast’ line, which I use less than you’d think to lure potential interviewees. Holger told me he’d love to be involved but he was leaving the UK – FOREVER – in the next few weeks but maybe we could work something out. We arranged a recording date and I duly pitched up at BPP for the interview as he’d very kindly given me some time during his last few days in the UK to meet with me. All was going well until he needed to take a call. Not a problem; I was taken downstairs for a tour of the library (I flipping love a library tour) by his colleague, with my iPhone in hand. To explain: I record the in-person interviews using the Voice Memo app on my phone. I checked my phone to make sure the recording was still there and it had DISAPPEARED.

Even now, more than three months on, I cringe at the memory of frantically searching through *all* the voice memos to make really, really sure the recording wasn’t lurking somewhere. Apple had recently updated the Voice Memo app and a product that had been bulletproof beforehand had become glitchy and weird. [True story: a week later I inadvertently exacted revenge when I dropped my iPhone 7 down five floors in Selfridges. The Voice Memo App works perfectly on the replacement, the iPhone X.] Worst of all, Holger was going to finish his phone call and expect to carry on with the interview. I had two options:

  1. Run, Run out of the building  – not an option as my bag and coat were in Holger’s office
  2. Confess and hope that I didn’t look like a total moron.

I went for option 2. Holger was spectacularly lovely about the whole sorry mishap. He found some time in his diary the following day (I was supposed to be at CILIP New Professionals Day but missed the morning session to do the re-record.) For take 2 I took my full recording setup – Blue Yeti Microphone and laptop – and we pretended we hadn’t met the day before as I asked him (mostly) the same questions and he gave (mostly) the same answers.

I really enjoyed recording this episode (the second time) and I’m pleased with the result. It was the first interview in which I included the new ‘What do you do when you’re not being a librarian’ question. Full credit to Gus MacDonald for suggesting that I include it.

The next episode will be released on Tuesday 26th February and features Rebecca Hill.

Happy listening!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

189.5 hours of CPD – or trying to stay sane when your professional life explodes

I updated my CPD log on the CILIP VLE recently. It should come as no surprise to anyone that I’ve accumulated a considerable number of CPD hours in the last twelve months. If anything, 189.5 hours might be an underestimate.

I think it’s worth giving this some context. The majority of my CPD has happened outside of work hours, aside from the conferences and events that I’m very kindly given time to attend by my manager. I’ve been asked a few times if I have a proper job, and if my employer minds. 1. I do, and I’ll be blogging about it separately at some stage. 2. My line manager’s view is that anything that gets my name (and, by extension, my employers’) ‘out there’ professionally in a positive way is to be embraced and celebrated. I mostly record Librarians with Lives episodes in the evening, when my children are in bed. I don’t do any CPD at weekends, or when I’m on leave.

The background noise accompanying this is my mental health. In the presentations I’ve done about mental health and professional resilience I mention that there were three different things that triggered my severe illness in 2016. I have talked in detail about the work-related aspect and gloss over the other two. Currently, my work life is great and acts as a protective factor because the other two bits (one health, and one not-my-actual-family) aren’t so great and, right now, one of them is severely affecting my general health and wellbeing.

The Librarians with Lives podcast also acted as a brilliant protective factor until, one day, it didn’t. I had a crazy 6 weeks in October and November where I presented at seven different events, including a wonderful two days at ILI where I ‘live’ podcasted the event. I’m grateful that I was so busy because otherwise I think things would have been very bad indeed. I’m not going to give airtime to events in the autumn, but I am going to talk about the impact that it had and continues to have.

I was about and about doing my thing, meeting people at professional events, involved in all the stuff I love – presentations and podcasting, meeting new people and making connections, and feeling nauseous and frightened the entire time. Second-guessing whether the person I was talking to was happy to be talking to me, or whether I was being sized up to determine what I was *really* like. Suddenly feeling mistrustful of people and politely distancing myself from those that I felt had enjoyed the drama at my expense a little too much. Batting away ‘I saw what happened. Are you ok?’ queries from concerned friends, strangers and bystanders so I didn’t worry them. Fretting that I (and by extension Librarians with Lives) was damaged goods, to be avoided. Turning my experiences into jokes in conference presentations. Laughing at the ludicrousness of it all while feeling angry and sad.

I knew that once I stopped podcasting and presenting and networking and being ‘Jo the Librarians with Lives person’, my brain would make me pay for distracting myself for so long. The intrusive, frightening thoughts I have when I’m in a really bad place returned with all kinds of disturbing new twists. I felt irrationally panicky most of the time. When I didn’t feel panicky I felt sad. At least I had stopped feeling nauseous by this point. I hadn’t experienced anxiety-induced nausea before and I don’t recommend it as an experience. I had a long break over Christmas and apart from being (physically) ill for part of the time, it was wonderful.

I gave myself space to make decisions without forcing it to do anything and realised that:

  1. I love my job. It’s not fashionable to stay with the same employer for so long but (highly edited highlights time – as I said earlier the full version will get airtime in the spring), in the last 10 years I have set up a library and information service for social workers across England from scratch building up a large user base in the process, I won an award for my work to embed evidence-informed practice across the organisation, my library has partnerships (which I set up) with three external bodies to whom we provide information services and there are more in the pipeline, and the LIS was mentioned in my employer’s recent Outstanding report from Ofsted. This isn’t stuff you can do if you change jobs every two years. It takes time and effort to build the necessary partnerships, connections, and reputation to achieve meaningful change. Why on earth would I walk away from a job that offers me the chance to get involved in projects across the organisation and influence the sector externally, that is highly valued and championed by its users, with brilliant colleagues, an organisation that has families and flexible working in its DNA, with a management team that ‘gets’ me and understands that by letting me be me they’ve got a sector-leading LIS out of it?
  2. The Librarians with Lives podcast is a positive force, that is valued by listeners and participants and is leading to small but meaningful changes to the profession. I have a slide I use in my presentation about podcasting depicting a world map with all the countries in which LwL is listened to coloured in. It blows my mind every time I update it. I started LwL as the tiniest of CPD projects to put into my Fellowship portfolio as a way of demonstrating wider professional involvement and the fact that so many people listen to it is just mind-blowing. I seriously considered stopping LwL in the autumn because I didn’t feel I could ever enjoy doing it in the same way again. I’m continually meeting and finding new people that I want to interview though, so it marches onwards. When I’m feeling down I try to remember that I’m better off being me, trying to be a force for good in the profession, raising people up rather than tearing them down.
  3. I would happily go and podcast at conferences every year for the rest of my working life, so do invite me *hint* *clang*
  4. I will achieve FCLIP this year. After my #fckfclip rant to my friend (not on social media) at the end of last year, I have resolved to get my CILIP Fellowship done in 2019. The carrot for me is that when I (finally) achieve Fellowship, I can go and get a nail technician qualification and somehow combine professional networking, podcasting, wellbeing and manicures together in one sparkly package.
  5. I’d like to do more to highlight mental health in the profession. Every time I’ve delivered my mental health and professional resilience presentation I have had a little queue of people who want to speak to me afterwards. Some want to thank me for being so honest and for raising awareness of difficult issues. Others want to share their own mental health experiences with me. I’m asked for advice on supporting partners, family members and colleagues struggling with mental health. I think there’s *something* valuable I can do here; I just need to work out what it is.

Over the last few months I’ve found it hard to appreciate all the positive things that have happened as a result of doing LwL, but here are a few to remind me:

  • The articles and news pieces in Information Professional, the MMiT blog, and in Business Information Review
  • The conference presentations in London, Brighton, Glasgow, Cambridge and Aberystwyth
  • The networking workshops with Mike, who I now count as a good friend
  • Being a guest on Calon FM in Wrexham with Paul
  • Appearing as an occasional recurring character on the Doctor WHEasel podcast
  • My theatre trips with Clare
  • Becoming one of the ‘faces’ of CILIP (I wrestled with this for a time; now I embrace it)
  • Running after people I would have been too scared to approach at conferences previously because they’re cool and amazing and asking them to be on my podcast (sorry Joshua). See also: ‘Stay there! You need to be on my podcast!’ (sorry Holger)
  • Podcasting at the ILI and CILIP conferences (possibly the most fun it is possible to have at a professional event)
  • Plotting to steal CILIP Presidential medals with Ellie and Rachel in Aberystwyth
  • Squealy, excited hugs with Sally and Margaret in Glasgow
  • The pre-conference dinner in Cambridge, where Claire engineered the seating plan to surround me with lovely people
  • Getting to know a whole load of people, most of whom I wouldn’t have otherwise met, as a result of doing LwL: Helen B, Clare, Mike E, Andrew, Juanita, Katherine, Michael, Laura, Amy, Helen M, Tracy, Nick, Alisa, Mike J, Jo C, Rhiannon, Elle, Hannah, Jen B, Jenny F, Caitlin, Kathryn, Tom P, Tom R, Jane, David, Louise, Emma, Anne, Natasha, Ian, Minnie/Emily, Kate G, Leah, Kate F, Gus, Kat, Brian, Alison, Helen L, Martin, Hal, Phil, Lynsey, Sally, Paul, Ellie, Holger, Angela, Naomi, all the people I’ve interviewed at conferences, and the forthcoming interviews with loads of awesome people.

I reference the concept of high-achieving anxiety in my presentations and while it’s not a recognised medical term, it absolutely fits my approach to all aspects of life. If I *have* to deal with being anxious and taking on too much to cope, I might as well get a lot out of it. If almost 190 hours of CPD time is what it takes to feel reasonably sane, I’ll do it.

LwL Podcast Episode 42: Strictly Musicals Side-special.

It’s side-special time! In Episode 42 of the Librarians with Lives podcast I chat to Clare McCluskey Dean, star of Episode 3 of LwL about our mutual love of all things Strictly Come Dancing, and musical theatre. It’s very fun, silly and sparkly and is the perfect antidote to the extremely intense period I’ve had recently of speaking at conferences and events, managing my anxiety, and much more. Clare is coming towards the end of the busiest period of her year and a house move. We were both in need of some daftness.

We recorded this episode on 12th November over Skype Audio. Two episodes of Strictly will have gone out between the day of recording and time of release of this episode, so I’ve removed anything that might resemble predictions, gossip and/or speculation. In terms of the musical theatre content, our opinions are very much our own and shouldn’t be treated as reviews. We know what we like (and don’t like) and get passionate about it, but in a nice way. We mention Clare’s theatre ramblings blog, which can be found here.

I have put together a playlist of the music and musicals we refer to, which is here.

Normal Librarians with Lives service resumes next week with the wonderful Sally Walker.

Keeeeeeeep listening!

 

Librarians with Lives at #ILI2018

I’m incredibly excited to announce that I have teamed up with Information Today and ILI: The Library Innovation Conference to bring you a special set of podcasts to introduce the event, celebrate 20 years of ILI, and speak to some of the key players involved.

I delivered a talk on Day 2 on Live, Love Librarian: the power of the podcast and I recorded an episode of LwL at the conference, similar to the episode I produced at #CILIPConf18 in July.

#LwLPod at #ILI2018 Episode 1 features Kat Allen, Brian Kelly, Alison McNab and Helen Lippell. Kat, Brian and Alison have been involved with ILI for many years and they are ideally placed to introduce the conference, reflect on the changes and innovations that they’ve seen over the years, highlight their must-sees, and offer advice to delegates. Helen is in charge of the Taxonomy Bootcamp, which runs alongside ILI.

This episode is a great introduction to the event for new and returning delegates and speakers. It also amplifies ILI to those who can’t attend the conference but want to follow along on social media.

Brian has written a blogpost reflecting on 20 years of ILI and Alison has written some helpful guidance for delegates to help them get the most out of attending conferences.

#LwLPod at #ILI2018 Episode 2 features Martin Hamilton, Futurist at JISC and Day 2 keynote speaker at the conference. Martin provides a (reasonably) spoiler-free introduction to his presentation and from there we have a wide-ranging chat about technology, the future of data storage, big ideas, space travel, billionaires doing mad things, etc.

#LwLPod at #ILI2018 Episode 3 features Hal Kirkwood and Natasha Chowdory, both of whom spoke on day 1 of the conference.

#LwLPod at #ILI2018 Episode 4 is the all-singing, all-dancing conference and Taxonomy Bootcamp special, featuring 50 delegates, speakers, vendors and organisers.

Happy listening!