Guest post #10 Professional Involvement – the #LwL way

Our latest guest post comes from another returning contributor: @georginahardy, who wrote for us previously on ‘Conversations in the pub’. This time she looks at professional involvement from a LwL perspective:

How many times have you heard professional activists telling you that “you will get more from CILIP if you put more in” and “it’s your professional organisation”?

At the end of this year, I will be stepping down as Chair for the West Midlands Division of the Career Development Group of CILIP, a role I have held for the last four years.  The role has been very rewarding:  I have had the opportunity to develop skills I don’t really use in my day job, I’ve met a wide range of interesting and enthusiastic professionals from all sectors of the library world, and it was a no-brainer in terms of gaining evidence for my Chartership portfolio.

But not all of us have the time or the sympathetic employers to allow us to attend committee meetings, organise full events, or edit a newsletter.  So here are a few suggestions of ways to engage with your professional institute that are eminently suitable for Librarians with Lives:

  • Check your special interest group membership.  Have you received newsletters from your special interest group in the last year?  Are you getting information from the most relevant groups?  When you renew your membership each year, consider whether you should change your special interest groups.  If you’re not getting anything out of your current membership, choose a different one.
  • Write an article for a newsletter.  Most regional branches and special interest groups have a newsletter or divisional newsletter of some sort (e.g. Central Issues).  This is an excellent way of maintaining your reflective writing skills once your Chartership is finished.
  • When your professional organisation asks for your opinion, give itVote in CILIP elections.  Complete questionnaires (such as the recent Defining our Professional Future consultation).  You might not be leading the charge, but you can certainly shape which direction it goes in.
  • Make suggestions.  You may not have the time or the opportunity to arrange an event or visit yourself, but you’re unlikely to be the only person interested and committees are always keen to find out what their membership would like them to do.
  • Follow and comment on blogs (such as the West Midlands Branch blog).  You’ll find plenty of discussion relevant to your professional institute via CILIP Communities, and it’s a good way to get your voice heard from the comfort of your home/office.

A word of caution: professionals with both the time and inclination to become activists are rare.  Once you express an interest, your local CILIP (branch or SIG) committee will be keen to involve you further.  Be prepared to say no, and state in advance the limits on your time.

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5 thoughts on “Guest post #10 Professional Involvement – the #LwL way

  1. That’s excellent advice, ta. I’m just about to plunge in to involvement and your proviso of stating your limited time availability up front will be foremost in my mind now. Cheers.

  2. Great post. The point about stating the limits on your time up front, and being prepared to say no, is particularly important – I wish I’d known that a year ago, when I was casting around for something to do with all my free time once I’d finished my dissertation, and suddenly found myself on three separate committees! I’ve managed to sort out the balance now I think, but for a while I was busier than I was when I was still studying :s

  3. Very interesting post – especially about being prepared to say no. I think its a fear of signing yourself up for something, and thinking you’ll be called upon time and time again. Not something I’ve experienced yet but was always a fear!

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